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EFAC Australia

Bishop John Harrower gave an outstanding Ridley College Anglican Institute Lecture on 11th April 2016 at Ridley College. It was the best attendance at one of these lectures, with a packed room.

In one sense the lecture was a wonderful window into John’s ministry as Bishop of Tasmania from 2000 to 2015. On the other hand, it gave us a great insight into the biblical and strategic leadership that was reflected in John’s episcopate. John spoke movingly of the courageous leadership he exercised in response to the sex abuse challenge. In many ways, he set trends which became the norm elsewhere.

When John started in Tasmania in 2000, he shared his vision that the Diocese of Tasmania would be known as ‘The Missionary Diocese of Tasmania’, and challenged every Anglican to live as a ‘missionary disciple.’ He concluded his first presidential address with these stirring statements:

  • You elected me, trust me.
  • You elected a missionary, let us be missionaries together.
  • You elected an innovator, let us be innovators together.
  • You elected a change agent, let us change together.
  • You elected a missionary bishop, let us be a missionary diocese.

The full text of John’s address can be found on the Ridley College website or by contacting the Diocesan office in Melbourne. Simply by listing some of the headings of John’s address under the title of ‘What can a Bishop and Diocesan Leadership Team do?’, you get get the feel of what John was on about.

Articulate vision, and the principals and messiness of mission

  • Build trust
  • Release resources to the margins
  • Monitor the pace of change
  • Review performance

John Harrower set a powerful example in Tassie for 15 years. It strikes me that it is a model that many more should consider adopting in other parts of our nation today. There are too many Dioceses that are being held back by a lack of a clear sense of vision and the lack of permission giving that should be at the heart of the episcopate. A bishop is there to promote the good of the church not to hold it back.

Stephen Hale is Vicar of St Hilary's Kew and Chair of EFAC Australia

Being a Church on Mission

Bishop John Harrower gave an outstanding Ridley College Anglican Institute Lecture on 11th April 2016 at Ridley College. It was the best attendance at one of these lectures, with a packed room.

In one sense the lecture was a wonderful window into John’s ministry as Bishop of Tasmania from 2000 to 2015. On the other hand, it gave us a great insight into the biblical and strategic leadership that was reflected in John’s episcopate. John spoke movingly of the courageous leadership he exercised in response to the sex abuse challenge. In many ways, he set trends which became the norm elsewhere.

When John started in Tasmania in 2000, he shared his vision that the Diocese of Tasmania would be known as ‘The Missionary Diocese of Tasmania’, and challenged every Anglican to live as a ‘missionary disciple.’ He concluded his first presidential address with these stirring statements:

You elected me, trust me.
You elected a missionary, let us be missionaries together.
You elected an innovator, let us be innovators together.
You elected a change agent, let us change together.
You elected a missionary bishop, let us be a missionary diocese.

The full text of John’s address can be found on the Ridley College website or by contacting the Diocesan office in Melbourne. Simply by listing some of the headings of John’s address under the title of ‘What can a Bishop and Diocesan Leadership Team do?’, you get get the feel of what John was on about.

Articulate vision, and the principals and messiness of mission
Build trust
Release resources to the margins
Monitor the pace of change
Review performance

John Harrower set a powerful example in Tassie for 15 years. It strikes me that it is a model that many more should consider adopting in other parts of our nation today. There are too many Dioceses that are being held back by a lack of a clear sense of vision and the lack of permission giving that should be at the heart of the episcopate. A bishop is there to promote the good of the church not to hold it back.

Stephen Hale

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